rural
Erewash

DERBYSHIRE ON YOUR DOORSTEP

Itineraries

These are ideas for some trips around rural Erewash.

You are advised to check details such as opening times and availability before you leave, as these may change from time to time. 

We’d love to see pictures of your Erewash outings and share them with others, so tag us at #ourerewash.

Choose your route from:

#ourerewash

ROUTE A


INSPIRING
CHILDREN

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Stoney Clouds
Nature Reserve

An aerial view of stoney clouds local nature reserve

Start with the “Walk in the Clouds” to get views across rural Erewash and see where you’re going next – or where you’ve come from.

On a clear day it’s a good spot for I-spy – points for church spires, canal bridges, wind turbines, water towers and a bonus point for Crich Stand, over 14 miles away.

The Lightning
Tree

the lightning tree on No Man's Lane in Erewash

From the bottom of Stoney Clouds, take Stanton Road to No Man’s Lane and head  towards Dale Abbey. Just under a mile after you cross over the M1, you’ll see the Lightning Tree on the left.  Park on the roadside and get another great view over Erewash.

If you’ve got time, follow the footpath over the field towards the hedgerow and see what wildlife you can spot.

The
Cowshed

Home made cake served at The Cowshed in Erewash

If it’s time for a break and something to eat and drink, drop into The Cowshed further along No Man’s Lane. Cakes, drinks, light lunches and ice cream are all on offer.

It’s under a mile from The Cowshed to your next stop at The Hermit Cave so is a walkable distance, but do check with the Cowshed that they are happy for you to leave your car in their car park. If you are driving, you can head for the village of Dale Abbey and park on the roadside, or you can park in the layby along Woodpecker Lane, where the public footpath leads into Hermit’s Wood.

The Hermit Cave,
Dale Abbey

the hermit cave, dale abbey

The cave is in Hermit’s Wood, which you reach by public footpath from the church in the village, or from the footpath opposite the road that leads to Stanton-by-Dale.

The wood is full of wildlife throughout the year. In spring, one of the first flowers to appear are the wood anemones which carpet the ground. Next come the bluebells and wild garlic and then the beech trees come into full leaf. Listen out for the birds, especially the cuckoo in the spring as it looks for a ready-made nest where it can lay its eggs and leave some unsuspecting bird to hatch and raise the young cuckoos.

Ockbrook
village

The Moravian church with clock tower at ockbrook

Part of the village was built in the 1700s by the Moravians, people that came from an area in Bohemia. Have a look at the old buildings in The Settlement which was where the Moravians first settled. 

Other interesting things to look out for in Ockbrook are the old flagstones on the path to the church, known as Bishop’s Walk – they came from the ruins of Dale Abbey. The large window at The Cross Keys is an old ‘knitters window’. The pub was where silk stocking makers worked and the large window was to give them enough light to work by. They even made Queen Victoria’s wedding stockings here.

Bluebell
Dairy Farm

delicious ice cream at Bluebells Farm Park

The final stop is 4 miles away at Bluebell Dairy, where you can revive energy levels with food and drink, use up any surplus energy in the play areas or wind down with the animals.

However everyone is feeling, make sure there’s room for a Bluebell Dairy ice cream to end the day.

ROUTE B


RAINY
DAY

It happens. You’ve planned time off, you’re ready to go out and explore Erewash – and then the sunshine takes time off too. 

What are you going to do? You can put on waterproofs, pack an umbrella and carry on regardless. Or you can avoid the rain by visiting these Erewash attractions which are undercover and will keep you as dry as possible. (You could stay at home, but where’s the fun in that?)

Share your ideas for rainy day entertainment in rural Erewash using the tag #ourerewash.

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The Bottle
Kiln

the bottle kiln at West Hallam

Start at West Hallam in the north of the borough with options for a beverage, browsing and buying at The Bottle Kiln. The shopping is divided into four sections – accessories, gifts, homeware and food – and you’ll find unique products in each of them, made by skilled crafts people.

The Japanese tea garden is best for dry days, but the cafe has indoor tables to keep the rain off while you plan your next stop.

Broomfield Hall
Plant Centre

derby college plant nursery

There’s a mixture of undercover and open air at this Derby College plant nursery, so keep your umbrella to hand. Get inspiration for your garden or allotment and buy plants at competitive prices, grown by the College students.

Check their website before leaving as the centre is closed at some times of the year.

The Elephant
Rooms

The Elephant Rooms wellbeing centre

You’ll need to have booked in advance, but the Elephant Rooms is the perfect place to take time and unwind when the weather prevents you from being outside.

There are a number of courses, workshops and groups that are run from here, including drama and nutrition workshops, yoga and pilates classes, book clubs and writing groups.

The Friars House
Cafe Gallery

coffee at the friars house, dale abbey

Hopefully the rain has stopped and you can have a wander around Dale Abbey, but if you still need a roof to keep off the rain, a visit to The Friars House is the perfect solution. The opening hours are described by the owners as ‘sporadic’, so check the website before leaving. But if it’s open, pop in and treat yourself to a bite to eat and peruse the local artworks on the walls.

If the weather allows, have a wander around Dale Abbey and visit the church – one of the smallest in the country.

ROUTE C


ACCESSIBLE
EREWASH

These are some ideas for places in rural Erewash with easy access and even roads and paths. Chosen because they are generally suitable for mobility scooters, wheelchairs, pushchairs, prams and for easy walking.

Share how you got on with these places – and any other you know in rural Erewash using #ourerewash

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The Great Northern
Greenway

the great northern greenway which runs between Derby and Breadsall

Start on the Derby side of Erewash, where over 3 miles of all weather surface takes you along the route of the old Great North Railway.

Along the way you’ll find the old Breadsall Station, where you can stop for a rest on the old platform and see what remains of the waiting room and station.

Nutbrook
Trail

Part of the nutbrook trail in Erewash

If you’re up for some more fresh air and countryside, head to the east of Erewash where you’ll find the longer traffic path – The Nutbrook Trail. Another flat route, following the towpath and old railway line.

There are a number of access points with varying accessibility. Off Stanton Gate, just south of the M1, the path joins from the road that runs between the canal and railway bridge and there is a small amount of off road parking (map reference 52.93955480686449, -1.2826097432574575).

The link here takes you to a PDF of a map showing the various access points.

Cat and Fiddle, or
The Cowshed

cat and fiddle, ilkeston

If you’re ready for a pub lunch, the Cat and Fiddle is 5 minutes drive away in Kirk Hallam and has inside and outside seating for all weathers.

Deliviosu home made cakes served at the cowshed in Erewash

8 minutes drive a bit further south is the Cowshed, where you can enjoy food and drink in the cafe, conservatory or outside.

Ockbrook
village

The Moravian church with clock tower at ockbrook

A short drive from both places is the fascinating village of Ockbrook. Pavements and on street parking make it easy to get around and see how the Moravian Church has shaped the village.

Other interesting things to look out for in Ockbrook are the old flagstones on the path to the church, known as Bishop’s Walk – they came from the ruins of Dale Abbey. The large window at The Cross Keys is an old ‘knitters window’. The pub was where silk stocking makers worked and the large window was to give them enough light to work by. They even made Queen Victoria’s wedding stockings here.

Round off your day with a stop at The Royal Oak in Ockbrook, or head to Bartlewood Lodge for a stone-baked pizza, burger, roast and a well deserved drink.

ROUTE D


THE EREWASH
CHALLENGES

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The Great Northern
Greenway

the great northern greenway which runs between Derby and Breadsall

Start on the Derby side of Erewash, where over 3 miles/4.8km of all-weather surface takes you along the route of the old Great North Railway.

Along the way you’ll find the old Breadsall Station, where you can stop for a rest on the old platform and see what remains of the waiting room and station.

Nutbrook
Trail

Part of the nutbrook trail in Erewash

If you’re up for some more fresh air and countryside, head to the east of Erewash where you’ll find the longer traffic-free path – The Nutbrook Trail.  Another flat route, following the towpath and old railway line for 10 miles/16km.

There are a number of access points with varying accessibility. Off Stanton Gate, just south of the M1, the path joins from the road that runs between the canal and railway bridge and there is a small amount of off road parking (map reference 52.93955480686449, -1.2826097432574575).

The link here takes you to a PDF of a map showing the various access points.

The Trent
Valley Way

The trent valley way as it runs along the River Trent at shardlow in Erewash

Created in 1998 and running 170 miles/274km from the source of the Trent near Biddulph Moor in Staffordshire to Alkborough in Lincolnshire, where the Trent joins the Ouse to form the Humber.

Only a small section runs through Erewash, but if you have time and are ready to accept the challenge you can follow it either way to make a much longer route. The path joins up with the Derwent Valley Heritage Way, Erewash Valley Trail and Derby Nomad Way, making an opportunity to create your own bespoke route.

Derwent Valley
Heritage Way

The derwent valley heritage way is signposted throughout its length

51 miles/82km along the River Derwent from Ladybower Reservoir to the River Trent at Shardlow.

Only a very small part of the path is in Erewash, around Borrowash and Little Eaton, but it’s right on the doorstep and offers short and long distance walks and a fantastic challenge for Erewash locals.

Erewash
Valley Trail

Locks on the canal next to the erewash valley trail

A circular walking and cycling route that covers 30 miles/48km between Langley Mill and Long Eaton, running up the east and west sides of the river and canal. 

The western side follows the Erewash towpath, the eastern side follows bridleways, towpaths, cycle routes and roads.

At various points it crosses or joins up with other long distance paths including the Nutbrook Trail, Trent Valley Way and Robin Hood Way, so you can extend the challenge into a mammoth route if you have the time – and energy.

For more information, the link here takes you to a PDF of the Erewash Valley Trail Guide leaflet or you can use the OS Explorer 260 map.

Canal
Circular

The erewash canal and the towpath which runs from Long Eato to Langley Mill

The Erewash Canal forms the eastern Erewash border and runs for 11.5 miles/19km and has 14 locks. Combine parts of it with the Nottingham Canal and it makes a 9 mile/14km circular route that is ideal for bikes and walkers wanting a moderate challenge.

Taking in Bennerley Viaduct, Straw’s Bridge, Manor Floods and the canal, it’s a great way to see Erewash.

The link provides you with more information on the Erewash Canal and Nottingham Canal Circular.

NEW! The Erewash
Ring

views over the fields near ockbrook

It’s not an official route and it’s only been roughly planned by a team member who loves a map – and a challenge. But it looks possible to travel around the approximate Erewash Borough boundary using a combination of roads, footpaths and bridleways.

Can you? Will you? Will we?

Tell us if you do, using #ourerewash

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